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Backhand swing techniques

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Subject:              Re: back hand power

  

>

>I have a question that may have already come up a few times in this group, but

>since i'm fairly new, i'm going to see if someone can help me. I need to

>develop a good back hand, but i'm not sure if i should practice it while i

>play, or just practice it alone. I tried it the other night in the court by

>myself, and just cant seem to get it right. I sometimes wish my back hand

>power was at least 50% of what the guys i play with have.. I have good power with

>my serves and kill shots, but for some reason i cant get any back hand power. I

>cant even get low shots without skipping the ball.... Its just one part of my

>game that i wish i had more of.. I tend to "snap" my wrists whenever i serve

>to get good power shots. It works great for me, but i cant figure out how to get

>that snap to work on my back hands. If anyone knows of any drills that is

>worth trying, i would appreciate the input. I know it has something to do with the

>mechanics of my swing.. At least i think... 

>

>

>*************************************************************



Hi:

Power on the backhand is a great subject.  You should try to practice the

backhand alone on a court just to get that feel you're talking about.  The

ability to integrate a good backhand to your game takes some time because of

the many variables you face in match play.

First remember that the racquetball stroke "backhand or forehand" is NOT a

forward motion into the front wall, but a rotational motion much like the golf

swing.  Many interpret the step into the front wall with that of a forward

motion.  The step with the front foot does serve a purpose though.  It lowers

your center of gravity where better balance will occur....it puts you into an

athletic postion where your torso can now rotate into the hitting zone...and it

actually should stop your body from going forward and allow you to have good

posture when contact is made.....

If you try to stride too much into the shot, your head, front hip, and shoulder

travels too far forward, thus eliminating the rotation of the hips....and as

many have said ...your power comes from the rotation of the hips...

Your goal should be to actually stop your head right behind your contact

point...one of the keys should be to snap your rear hip forward..with your back

knee bent..making contact just in front of, and close to, your front knee...

Also remember that the plane of the stroke follows the plane of your shoulders,

Therefore..(imagine this) if you agressively step forward into the shot and

most of your body weight is on your front foot..the tendency is to stand a bit

too straight on the front leg, which slightly dips the front shoulder...this

produces more skips than any other element in the game....if you can control

your body so that your head and your front shoulder STAY BACK and allow the

back side of your body to rotate through to the hitting zone,,you will produce

much more power and level the swing... another thing about striding forward too

much..because of the body weight being so far forward...another tendency is to

swing down into the ball causing a slice or chopping into the ball ...this also

take away power....

I didn't really address the actual mechanics of the swing..because it's tough

to break down every part of the swing without showing you...but if you can

learn to control the body first "rotational swing of the torso", your stroke

will line itself up better...

DanO