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Subject: Re: Beginner Date: Thu, 09 Mar 2000 19:28:16 GMT From: "Leo R. Vasquez" Organization: FlashNet Communications, http://www.flash.net Newsgroups: alt.sport.racquetball References: 1 russ, go to http://www.usra.org/usra/programs/ampro/01direct.htm and find an instructor in your area. call and see if that instructor does any free clinics at clubs adn start with that. if you feel the need for personal attention, i would definitely recommend a lesson or two. learning from somone who is experienced in instruction will add new dimensions to your game as well as provide any insight on taking you to the next level. let me know if i can help out, Leo R. Vasquez Team E-Force AmPRO Professional Instructor http://www.flash.net/~lvasquez/ "RJ" wrote in message news:38c7dbb7_2@news1.prserv.net... > I've always enjoyed racquetball, and have played frequently as I've gotten > older (28). I'd like to take my game to the next level and would appreciate > any strategy tips on how a beginner should first approach this wonderful > game. Thank you > > Russ > >
Subject: Re: Beginner Date: 09 Mar 2000 18:18:46 GMT From: kathyklg@aol.com (KathyKlg) Organization: AOL http://www.aol.com Newsgroups: alt.sport.racquetball References: 1 My comments second Scott's opinion. Get involved in any kind of playing scenario where you will play and observe a diversity of players. Finding a single partner at the early part of your game can stifle your development, encourage bad habits, etc. Join a league or find an active challenge court, spend time observing who seems to have good credentials, and start thinking about lessons. Kathy Geels Miami
Subject: Re: Beginner Date: Thu, 9 Mar 2000 10:08:07 -0800 From: "Scott" Organization: CTS Network Services Newsgroups: alt.sport.racquetball References: 1 Play! Talk to the league director in your club and find out when the in house leagues take place. Show up at the open court nights and play. You will only improve as you play people who are better than you. I'm not implying that you should take on the club pro your first week in. Talk with him and get a few pointers. Warm up well, and Play, Play, Play.!!!!! My .02 sfs RJ wrote in message <38c7dbb7_2@news1.prserv.net>... >I've always enjoyed racquetball, and have played frequently as I've gotten >older (28). I'd like to take my game to the next level and would appreciate >any strategy tips on how a beginner should first approach this wonderful >game. Thank you > >Russ > >
Subject: Re: Beginner Date: Thu, 9 Mar 2000 15:29:02 -0500 From: "Jared P Johnston" Organization: Picus Communications LLC Newsgroups: alt.sport.racquetball References: 1 Russ, I just decided to take my game to a higher level. I have been playing on a recreational level and just started entering tournaments. It has been amazing what playing against other players who have a more competitve edge than the recreational player can do for your game. I have gone from a recreational player to winning matches against "B" level players. Competition does wonders. Jared J. "RJ" wrote in message news:38c7dbb7_2@news1.prserv.net... > I've always enjoyed racquetball, and have played frequently as I've gotten > older (28). I'd like to take my game to the next level and would appreciate > any strategy tips on how a beginner should first approach this wonderful > game. Thank you > > Russ > >

Subject: Re: Beginner Date: 11 Mar 2000 08:52:32 GMT From: jordanisra@aol.com (Jordan Kahn) Organization: AOL http://www.aol.com Newsgroups: alt.sport.racquetball References: 1 OK, I will jump into this too. Regarding the best way to practice. I have practice lots of ways. At first I did what everyone else did, bounce off the sidewalk or back wall. Then just smack the ball around and play all the shots off the back wall, letting kill attempts bounce a bunch of times. But the most effective practice I ever did, or "forced" my friends and students to do was a repetition drill using a modified tennis hopper that holds 100 racquetballs. Forget about bouncing the ball on the floor or even a side or back wall, just hit the ball on the fly before it hits the ground. Of course you need to "step' into every shot, preferably using a multi-step shuffle step. More advanced "high" percentage shots can actually be practice off balanced on the wrong foot or with your body out of position, as long as every shot is the same off balance practice. This does a bunch of things required for successful practice… 1.) Consistent Repetitive Motion 2.) Quantity with Quality Practice 3.) Real Game Practice Situations 1) Consistent Repetitive Motion from not allowing the ball to touch the floor or wall before hitting. This shortens the length of the "toss" and helps keep every "toss" in the same place. Without this, the ball speed, height and direction may change, making it more difficult to learn a "controlled" practice shot, footwork and swing. 2) Quantity with Quality Practice from hitting the exact shot over and over. Using a ball hopper, or container, up to three balls can be picked up with the non-racquet hand at one time. By tossing and hitting one ball at a time, it is possible to hit 100 balls in less than 5 minutes, if the container holds 100 balls. 3) Real Game Practice Situations allow players to practice when body and balance are as tired as a real game. By using a container with 100 balls, an aerobic practice can be used that simulates a second or third "rally" while the hitter is tired and weak from the previous practice shots. Using one ball allows the hitter time to catch their breath or be forced off balance in a "random" practice. Try not to think, just set up your position without hesitating or thinking and hit the ball. In a real game, nature ability without thinking where you are aiming is very important. Always use a marked target and the smallest target possible when aiming. The smaller the target, the sharper your focus and skill. Don't place a racquet cover when you can place and aim at a ball. You will be surprised at the results. When practicing kill shots, start off by actually hitting the floor under the target and work your way up. Most players have a mental block about "skipping". It is easier for most players to adjust their practice "kill" shots by allowing and encouraging "skip" balls until their swing can slowly adjust to the correct height. Hitting less than 50 balls is warming up, not practicing. Hit as many balls (count them) from the same spot to achieve maximum results. Make sure you allow your body to relax and cool down after 50 - 100 balls. The top pros are in great shape, you probably are not. Drink plenty of fluids during practice, remember, ten minutes of hard practice as described above, may feel the same as playing a real game for one hour. Sorry I didn't explain specific types of drills, there are so many types to use, and only your imagination can prevent you from creating new drills. Good luck, Jordan PS. Years ago a friend asked me to play so he could practice for his first major tournament. Instead I gave him my ball hopper and said practice 3 or 4 hoppers (300-400 balls) of his weakest shot, which was his backhand. I will never forget how amazed he was about his increased skill when he played. This type of practicing adds confidence and enhances skills at the same time.